Previous Meetings

January 2018

Meylonie Shatz entertained us with a series of quilts throughout her quilting journey. She started the show with a magnificent quilt that has won many national awards. Then she let is know the quilt was not hers. She did not make it. She borrowed it from a friend.

The quilts she did make and shared with us were equal in amazement. She is so incredibly creative and expresses it well.

M Schatz 2M Schatz 3   M Schatz 1

 

 

 

(Our apologies. We had a lapse in coverage but will work hard to do better.)

 

 

 

October 2015

Brazilian embroidery to be featured at Nebraska City Needleworkers meeting in October.
Nebraska City, Neb., Oct. 13, 2015 — During the Oct. 27 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City, Gaylene Abrahamson of Omaha will explain some of the techniques and uses of Brazilian embroidery.

The embroidery method uses richly colored rayon threads of varying weights to create heavily textured, nearly three-dimensional images.

Abrahamson, a lifelong Omaha resident, said she was introduced to Brazilian embroidery about three years ago and began teaching it to others about a year and a half ago.

Abraham’s grandmother taught her to sew when she was in grade school. She sewed garments for many years but took up quilting after she retired in 2012 after 30 years working for Qwest telecommunications, now CenturyLink.

“I have been doing embroidery, needlepoint, crewel, knitting, crocheting and cross stitch as long as I remember,” she said. “I have always loved handwork.”

During her career at Qwest, Abrahamson worked at a number of business-related posts, including as a manager, sales support and as an instructor.

She said teaching Brazilian embroidery combines the instructional skills she gained at Qwest with embroidery skills.

“I love this art,” she said.

The Heritage Needlework Guild meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church at 315 S. 16th St. in Nebraska City. Meetings begin with social time at 6:30 p.m. with the program to begin at 7 p.m. Guests are welcome to attend guild meetings. Membership is open to those interested in all forms of needlework and is not limited to quilters.

Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary15 Mary14 Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics Mary Mayfield Tanzanian Fabrics

May 2015

Hickman quilter Bonnie Kucera to tell how to make “blah” quilts “ahh”-some.

Bonnie Kucera knows quilters sometimes tire of working on a project because it just lacks a certain spark.

“It’s OK, but they have no inspiration to finish it, because it isn’t that interesting,” she said.

During the May 26 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City, Kucera will offer ideas on how to revive blah projects. The meeting also will feature a potluck supper, with members whose last name begins with the letters A through J in the alphabet to supply dishes. The meeting, at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 315 S. 16th St. in Nebraska City, begins with a social time at 6:30 p.m., with the program starting at 7 p.m.

Kucera, who is from Hickman, specializes in making quilts from scraps. Some of her projects have been assembled from pieces smaller than an inch across.

Her program, “From Ugly Ducklings to Shimmering Swans,” uses humor and plenty of examples from her sewing room to help fellow quilters take a fresh look at their work.

“There will be ‘ahhs,’ and there will be ‘ahas!’,” she said.

Even though recent cataract surgery has slowed her down, Kucera said she will have a new scrap quilt top to show those attending the meeting.

A ranchers’ daughter from the Sandhills in north central Nebraska, Kucera grew up sewing her own clothing. After earning a degree in interior design from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, she moved to California for eight years, where she worked for an interior design firm and obtained an accounting degree.

She discovered quilting after she returned to Nebraska, and met and married her current husband, Douglas Kucera. She has won Best of Show at the Nebraska State Fair twice, in 1994 and in 2000, and has had quilts selected by a jury for the International Quilt Festival in Houston and the American Quilt Society Show in Paducah, Ky. Quilting has been her sole occupation since 2002.

“Using scraps is hard – and it takes practice, practice, practice,” she said. “You will have failures, but that helps you get better. Don’t be afraid to do that.”

Heritage Needlework Guild meetings are held on the fourth Tuesday of every month, except for December. Guest are welcome to attend meetings. The guild studies all forms of needlework and membership is not limited to quilters.

Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera BK11 Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera BK08 Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera Bonnie Kucera

At the beginning of our business meeting we have Sew N Tell from the members and guests. These are a few of what was shown this night.

0515 Sew N Tell 0515 Sew N Tell 0515 Sew N Tell 0515 Sew N Tell 0515 Sew N Tell Bonnie Kucera

 

March  2015

Thursday. March 24th, was the Heritage Needlework Guild’s monthly meeting. The meeting was moved to Bethel United Church for the evening.

Sheila Reinke, of Omaha, was our speaker. Sheila used to teach at the Hancock Fabric retreats. She has great quilts that look much more difficult than they actually are. She has a great way of teaching them as well. This is a sampling of what she brought.

Sheila Reinke  Sheila Reinke, speaker She showed us how each quilt was put together. This is called “My Home Town”. Each building has a quilt block stitched within that has representation to the building.  The way they are all slightly off center really adds charm.

Sheila Reinke  Sheila ReinkeShe   has great boards that break down the blocks within each quilt and how they are pieced.  This is “Garden Stroll”.

Tennessee Waltz  ???????????????????????????????These are “Tennessee Waltz” shown in two color ways. It is incredible they way they change just by the fabric choice.

 

Calypso QuiltThis is “Calypso Quilt”. It was a free pattern from Fabric Quilt. It looks different in person. If you aren’t sure about the blocks you are laying out, take a photo of them. You will see a different view.

Marble Pools  ??????????????????????????????? This is Marble Pools shown is two color ways. This is a super easy pattern which goes together very fast and smooth.

 

Welcome to My Cabin “Into the Forest” is from the book Welcome to My Cabin. This is really pretty and has a great design.

Black Tie  Black Tie I’m glad she had the board up for this one. Our holders and folders had tired arms by the time we got to the end. This quilt is real pretty and Sheila said it goes together so fast that attaching all the borders took longer than piecing the blocks for the quilt top.

??????????????????????????????? shopping time

Sheila brought patterns, books, rulers, threaders, and other fun things available to purchase to make many of the quilts she had shown.  Good thing our husbands don’t know about this site! I think we about cleaned Sheila out of what she brought!

We had Sew N Tell next. Here is a portion of what was brought to share:

SewnTell 1 Bonnie 1 Bonnie ??????????????????????????????? APQ QuiltKathys Signatue QUilt

Bonnie Haith taught a class called Metro Rings. These are her quilts from this class. One again, the fabric choices really make an impact

Metro RingsMetro Rings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathy Morgan is in charge of Community Quilts. These quilts go out to those in emergency situations from house fires. removal from a home, hospital stays, and many other reasons. They are dispersed through various agencies in southeast Nebraska. southwest Iowa and northwest Missouri where we have guild members.

This month we had 9 quilts completed and 3 that are going to members to be bound.

Community Quilts Community Quilts Community QuiltsCommunity Quilts

July 2014 Meeting

The speaker at the July 22 meeting is pattern designer Amy Bradley of Lawrence, Kan., who features whimsical characters such as the “Quilt Diva,” “Super Quilter” and the “Bountiful Beauties” in her machine-applique designs.
It all started a dozen years ago, when Bradley’s husband, John, surprised her with a Bernina sewing machine as a Mother’s Day gift. Bradley, who holds a degree in fine arts and graphic design from Kansas State University, worked as a graphic designer for industrial design firms at the time. As a thank-you gift, she decided to design a quilt for her husband’s veterinary clinic.

The finished piece – “Dazzling Dogs” – featured 12 comical dogs of different breeds, each wearing a pair of glasses, stitched in brightly colored fabrics. Though she had started making quilts in the 1980s, Bradley had never designed a quilt before. “What was funny, was when I designed ‘Dazzling Dogs’, I didn’t know how to do fusible applique, I didn’t know how to do machine buttonhole stitch. I designed 12 dogs and the first block didn’t look pretty. But I learned quick.” She told her husband that she intended to turn Dazzling Dogs into a quilt pattern business. His response: “Do people buy those?”

She started selling her patterns at the International Quilt Market in Houston in 2002. In 2003, she appeared on HGTV’s “Simply Quilts” program. Now with her patterns and other items featuring her designs sold in stores and outlets across the country, Bradley says her husband asks her: “When can I retire?”

A lifelong resident of Kansas, Bradley’s business is based in a metal building behind her country home outside Lawrence. She and her husband also raise Hereford cattle. Her daughter, Ashley Heryer, who holds an MBA degree, has worked with her for more than two years, handling business and marketing. “I’m living the dream for sure – and having my daughter work with me is icing on the cake,” said Bradley, who still sews with the Bernina her husband gave her in 2002.

Heritage Needlework Guild meetings are held on the fourth Tuesday of each month in the basement of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Third Corso and 16th Street in Nebraska City.

Come join us and see what we are about. We love new members. The HNG is not only about quilting. All forms of needlework are appreciated and welcome.

June 2014 Meeting
2 Budts and a Hug

The guild’s membership meeting begins at 7:00 with a social time before.

The program in June is “Two Budt’s and a Hug” given by members Linda Hug, Delta Budt and their sister Donna Budt. These ladies are as entertaining as their name appears.

For the past eight years, sewing sisters Linda Hug, Delta Budt and Donna Budt have competed in their own quilting challenge to improve their skills, strengthen their family ties and just have fun together.

The livCircle Quiltsely trio will tell about their challenge and display their completed projects during the June 24 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City.

Sewing has always been part of their lives, Hug recalls. The trio grew up sewing with their mother, Elvada Schneider, in Johnson, Neb. Hug now lives in Auburn, Neb., Delta Budt lives in Cook, Neb., and Donna Budt lives in Helena, Mont. Delta and Donna married brothers.

Each year, one sister picks a quilt pattern and all three make their own version of the project.

“Since I’m the oldest, I got to pick out the first pattern,” Hug said. “They (the projects) are kind of a secret. We don’t show them to each other until we’re done. Then we get together and have a little quilt show.”

The challenge quilts are only part of the sisterly sharing. They also have made shirts, wall hangings and other little projects for one another. One year, all three went on the Nebraska Shop Hop together, an annual event where sewers try to visit as many fabric shops across the state as they can. At each store, they purchased “fat quarters” – a half-yard of fabric cut in half, lengthwise, to form an 18- by 22-inch rectangle, instead of the 9-inch strip of the traditional quarter yard of fabric. Their challenge that year was to turn those fat quarters into quilts.

This year’s Shop Hop featured fabric with a Nebraska design. Hug and Delta Budt bought extra fabric to send their sister in Montana so that all three could make a Nebraska quilt.

Heritage Needlework Guild meetings are held on the fourth Monday of each month in the basement of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Third Corso and 16th Street in Nebraska City.

Come join us and see what we are about. We love new members. The HNG is not only about quilting. All forms of needlework are appreciated and welcome.

May 2014 Meeting

We had a fun presentation by Sandra Anderson from Lincoln NE. Sandy is a soft sculpture doll maker with a lot of friends! She told about how she got into doll making and the different clubs and swaps she has been a part of over the years. Here are a few of the personalities she shared with us.

We had a fun presentation by Sandra Anderson from Lincoln NE. Sandy is a soft sculpture doll maker with a lot of friends! She told about how she got into doll making and the different clubs and swaps she has been a part of over the years. Here are a few of the personalities she shared with us.

Sandy A fish Ballerinas past their prime SandyA Teacup doll

We had Sew N Tell. Our President, Kristi Bednar (on the right), started off the show by bending tAnn Bade and Kristihe rules and giving the membership a sneak preview of the 2015 Opportunity Quilt made and given by Ann Bade (pictured on the left) . The machine quilting was donated by Nancy Houchin. It is a great quilt – but I’m not going to spoil the surprise. Pictures will be added after the quilt show in September when the current opportunity quilt is presented to the winner. That quilt is what is pictured on the HNG home page.

Irene Fisher

 

Irene Fisher is pictured on the right of her version of the guildIrene Fisher Blocks of the Month‘s Block of the Month embroidery.

We received patterns in January and Irene surprised us with a quilt top of the completed blocks. She might be considered an over achiever – but I think she is an inspiration! Well done Irene!

 

Kathy Morgan MayKathy Morgan shared several Community Quilts that are done or need to be quilted. This is one that she pieced and machine quilted. In 2013 the guild made and gave away 45 community quilts to local organizations. To date in 2014 there have been 33 made and donated.

Last fall Kathy ask for a Sew-In day to work on Community Quilts. The guild had a positive response to this and since then we have had more days. With members from western Iowa, clear southeast Nebraska up to Lincoln – the sew-in days move around to give everyone the opportunity to contribute. LoisWhiteheadQOV1

Lois Whitehead QOV2

 

Lois Whitehead shared this Quilt of Valor she made from fabrics donated to the Community Quilt project. She took the fabrics home from the most recent community quilt day and made this great quilt! Thanks Lois!

 

 

 

LindaHugMayLinda Hug showed us her latest quilt. Isn’t this colorful?? Linda and her sisters will be our presenters at the June guild meeting. They are “2 Budt’s and a Hug”. No doubt that is going to be a fun show! She and her sisters do a challenge each year between themselves. We love to hear about what each one did, It is always entertaining. Linda is also this year’s 2014 Quilt Show Featured Member.

 

 
April 2014 Meeting
T’resa Jones brought a wonderful powerpoint of red & white quilts and shared her won collection as well.
The exhibit featured 651 quilts, most of them antiques, and all red and white. They belonged to Joanna S. Rose, a prominent New Yorker who began purchasing red-and-white quilts in the 1950s. The once-in-a-lifetime event marked her 80th birthday — she had told her husband she wanted to give something to New York City and she wanted to see something she’d never seen before. She’d never seen all of her quilts, all at once.
Jones, a quilter and quilt teacher, will deliver a lecture about the historic exhibit during the April 22 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City.
The exhibit, coordinated by the American Folk Art Museum, lasted only six days. Jones said she felt lucky to see it — she happened to have planned a trip to New York at the time.
“I still feel very lucky,” she said. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever seen or will see again. It was awe-inspiring, seeing 651 red-and-white quilts all in one space. I’m not a photographer, but my little point-and-shoot (camera) didn’t do too bad in capturing the essence of that show.”
The quilts were hung in three tiers surrounding a spiral staircase in the two-story space. The only light in the room was that illuminating the quilts themselves, with the lights positioned to highlight the quilting lines even on the uppermost pieces.
Jones, who has been quilting since the 1970s, administers the annual “Baltimore on the Prairie” hand applique workshop held at Mahoney State Park. Named in honor of the historic Baltimore Album quilts that feature elaborate floral applique designs, the workshop featuring national and international-level teachers now is in its sixth year.
Jones developed her lecture soon after seeing the red-and-white quilt exhibit. She’s delivered the program, which includes 60 to 70 photographs, about 20 times.
“It’s hard to explain how spectacular they were,” she said.

 March 2014 Community Quilt Sew-In
On March 29th, a cold and foggy morning, Valerie Seevers opened up her home for guild members to gather and work on Community Quilts. We take pride in the quilts we donate. Here are pictures from that sew in day. Thank you, ladies, for giving your Saturday. Thank you Valerie for the best potato soup ever!

Missouri River 3.29.14 Sew In1

??????????????????????????????? Gloria Hall Sew in 3.29.14

 

 

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